Love Your Eagle Month

What a week we have had along the Hudson River. The eagles are enjoying the open water and the snow goose is staying.

“Alice, come back!”
Youngster hoping for an easy catch of the day
Right spot, right time
The fishing has to be better over there
This may be my New Year’s Day bird – tail feather coloring looks familiar
Snow goose trying to get some uninterrupted sun
River watchers team

Eagles in the ‘Hood

There’s one good thing about the polar vortex. It brings a Convocation of Eagles. Please enjoy photos of our recent arrivals. The local residents are protesting with signs that say, “Private Property, NO Trespassing!!”

Fresh sushi
Most likely a local bothered by the eagle invasion
My Gal giving me her eagle eyes
Gorgeous adult in breeding plumage
Youngster flying with the big boys
Kettle of eagles just before a major snow squall
The crows were not happy about this first year parking on their tree.

New Year Delights

This 2019 year has started off on the right birds for me. Featured image is an American Tree Sparrow in the freezing cold.

This lovely lady landed in front of me as I was driving to breakfast on New Years Day.
An hour later, my red-tailed hawk was hunting on the landfill.
Not to be left out, one of my totem birds, a great blue heron, was engaged on a local pond.
Of course, the mute swans were around, too.
A very few days later, my local traveling companion joined me at my park.
The red-shouldered hawk was not to be left out of the photos, even in the pouring rain.

My local resident female eagle and I communed for fifteen minutes. I left. She stayed.
And in a severe ice attack, our wintering eagles arrived. I am blessed today.

Bonnie’s Best of 2018

Most have seen these photos. I chose six that I consider to be superior.

Eagle pair – he brought a gift and she accepted – *they are not fighting
Purple finch in my yard
Cardinal on berries
Red-shouldered hawk at the train station
Great blue heron juvenile with its golden catch of the day
Peregrine falcon coming in to displace its father

This and That

It is time to post a few recent photos.  The raptors always come first.  Then it is for the little guys.

Eagle pair close to home

Local red-shouldered hawk
Young Cooper’s hawk at the feeder buffet
Purple finch in the backyard

Cape May warbler migrating through the backyard
Cedar waxwing enjoying the last bites of Fall
Eastern phoebe looking for bugs
Palm warbler waking the dead

Open Studio

My barn was open to all kinds of visitors during the Ossining Arts Council Open Studios Tour 2018.  I had kept the feeders filled all week long in hopes of having a few birds at the feeders as people perused my photos.  I learned that I have to sit outside in my backyard for much longer periods of time during fall migration.  Enjoy the group.  Our local sharp shinned also made a very brief visit to enjoy the snacks.
Purple finch, one of four to come to my feeders
Cape May warbler just passing through
Red-breasted nuthatch sharing space
I’m sure this bird had a quick bite

A Picture Is Worth A Thousand Words

Enjoy these photos from around the Lower Hudson River.  The ospreys will be leaving soon, but the kingfisher stays around all year.  Our immature great blue herons from a nearby rookery invade the area and some do stay.

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Belted kingfisher on its favorite dead tree
Great blue heron youngster really trying to catch a fish
Different great blue heron kid focused on the fishing
American kestrel on the landfill
Northern Harrier sharing the same landfill
Resident red-tailed hawk taking a break from the kids

Watered Down

It’s all about the water birds in this summer heat.

Cormorant Landing

 

Young Eagle Fishing

 

Mallard Molting

 

Young Heron Hunting

 

Great Egrets Wading

And one dragonfly

Fabulous Falcons

I can’t seem to get away from the Jersey falcons.  My yearly Rochester Falcon Watchers’ Weekend happened in Elizabeth, NJ this year.  Cadence, hatched in 2015 in Rochester and pictured below as a juvenile, is now raising a family of four this year.  Her brood is learning to fly and hunt.  I do believe I saw or heard all four juvies at one time.

Cadence and her unbanded mate, Allen, were in their usual spots atop the Union County Courthouse antennae.  Seven o’clock on a Sunday morning is the best time to visit.  I heard falcon begging and hoped the kids had not eaten too much before my arrival.

I started on the NW side of the tower where the igloo is located, but decided the garage roof would give me the best view.  Yup!  I spotted one of the young to the west on a building nearest the tower.

All of a sudden, as is falcon custom, brunch arrived courtesy of Cadence and so did the kids who didn’t look all that hungry.  Guess who came in first?  Too easy, of course it was the young female, Akira, who didn’t look willing to share.

I heard more begging and thought I saw a third or fourth youngster on the satellite dish behind me.  A kestrel was pretending to be a peregrine.

But, lo and behold!  For sure a third juvie wanted to help me photograph the gang on the courthouse tower!  He kept getting closer and closer to me.  I definitely do not look like Kathy Clark, the NJ biologist who medicated and banded him.  He definitely looked like he had just had a meal.

Allen joined Cadence and Akira to finish off the huge pigeon meal.  But he had to sneak up on Akira or she may have injured him.  Both adults watched her to continue to gorge.

Two of the boys joined each other for a game of hide and seek and tag on the building across the train tracks to the west.  Cadence went back to her post on top of the antenna and Akira was left alone.